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EMILIA LAMBRUSCO

A NEW CLASSIC

EMILIA LAMBRUSCO

MARANI

Lambrusco Marani belongs to the great and ancient Lambrusco family, cited as far back as the days of Virgil and then by Pliny, who witnessed its presence and salient features in his Naturalis Historia.

Lambrusco Marani belongs to the great and ancient Lambrusco family, cited as far back as the days of Virgil and then by Pliny, who witnessed its presence and salient features in his Naturalis Historia.

Lambrusco Marani is (along with Grasparossa) is a rare Lambrusco grown in hillside vineyards, though it is most often found on flatlands, where it proves resistant to relatively damp soils (it likes clay) but is susceptible to winter cold. It prefers low-density cultivation systems with short pruning and it’s yields are abundant and regular (1).

Little documentation exists of this variety’s presence as recently as the twentieth century. It is a close relative of Fogarina, a variety native to Emilia-Romagna. Nowadays, it grows mainly in the countryside around Reggio Emilio near towns such as Campagnola, Fabric, Novellara, Rolo and Rio Saliceto, the same habitat as Lambrusco Maestri: the two are often planted together in the same vineyard.

Areas where Lambrusco Marani is produced

Little documentation exists of this variety’s presence as recently as the twentieth century. It is a close relative of Fogarina, a variety native to Emilia-Romagna. Nowadays, it grows mainly in the countryside around Reggio Emilio near towns such as Campagnola, Fabric, Novellara, Rolo and Rio Saliceto, the same habitat as Lambrusco Maestri: the two are often planted together in the same vineyard.

Today it is also grown around Bologna and Mantova: at over twenty-three hundred hectares planted as of 2000 , it was a relatively abundant Lambrusco, but things have changed greatly over the course of the last ten years, and its surface under vine has decreased by 41 percent. This is because modern producers prefer to plant (or replant) Lambrusco Maestri, which gives much fruitier and richer wines. Lambrusco Marani is characertized by looser-packed bunches and smaller, almost elliptical berries than most other Lambruscos (1).

The wines are fruity and tannic, and thanks to fairly high acidity, come across as having a more floral quality (violet, iris, peony) and a little less sweetness and fruity flesh (black currant and red cherry, instead of ripe black cherry) than those made with Lambrusco Maestri.

Well made Marani wines tend to be refined and not too tannic, with a bright, juicy personality. Marani is the mainstay variety of DOC Reggio Lambrusco, but is also part of DOC blends of Lombardy’s Lambrusco Mantovani and Emilia-Romagna’s Colli di Scandiano e Canosa wines (where it is usually blended with Lambrusco Montericco). It is present in suchh IGT blends as Emilia (or dell’Emilia), Forli, Lambrusco Mantovano, Quistello, Ravenna, Reggiano, Rubicone, and Sabbioneta, as well as others (1).

Refrences:
(1.) D'Agata, Ian. "Native Wine Grapes of Italy
photo catalogoviti.politicheagricole.it

The city center of Correggio, one of the main villages where Lambrusco Marani is produced. The name comes from the Latin "corrigia or corrigium" , which means " leather strip " with the meaning extension of " strip of land between swamps " or " strip of land between the waters ".