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EMILIA LAMBRUSCO

A NEW CLASSIC

EMILIA LAMBRUSCO

SALAMINO

Lambrusco Salamino is so called for its appearance: the short and cylindrical grape bunch will remind you, and everyone else, of a salame.

Given Italy’s love affair with salame (over two hundred and fifty varieties at last count) it’s not surprising that a grapevine would be named after one of the country’s favorite foods. Lambrusco Salamino is so called for its appearance: the short and cylindrical grape bunch will remind you, and everyone else, of a salame. Though also called Lambrusco Galassi and Lambruschino, the most commonly used synonym is Lambrusco Salamino di Santa Croce, as it originates from the area of Santa Croce de Carpi near Modena (1).

At over four thousand hectares, it is the most planted of all Lambruscos, grown mainly in the provinces of Modena and Reggio Emilia, and more rarely around Bologna, Ferrara and Mantova. Its abundance in the Modena countryside is explained not just by its intrinsic qualities (in some respects, it’s the best of all Lambruscos, as its wines combine the grace and fragrance of Lambrusco di Corbara with the power and body of Lambrusco Grasparossa) but because it is also not used as a polluter for the Sorbara variety. Blessed by good vigor, it is a late ripener like all Lambruscos, but guarantees steady, copious yields. It likes fresher soils and can stand up to humid conditions very well (1).

Areas where Lambrusco Salamino is produced

Lambrusco Salamino is more often found in an off-dry (semi-secco) or frankly sweet (dolce) style, than in a dry one (secco). It is dark purple-ruby in color with aromas of violet, rose and small, red and dark berries and though fairly tannic, can be almost creamy, especially when compared to Lambrusco di Sorbara wines. The soils it grows in have variable proportions of clay, sand and silt, so the quality of the wine depends mostly on yields and individual producer skill. DOC wines include Reggiano Lambrusco Salamino and Lambrusco Salamino di Santa Croce (minimum 90% Salamino) , but Lambrusco Salamino can also be included int he DOC blends of Lambrusco di Corbara, Lambrusco Mantovani, and the Colli di Scandiano e Canossa. IGT wines in which it can be present are Alto Mincio, Emilia (or dell’Emilia), Rubicone, and Sabbioneta, among others (1).

Refrences:
(1.) D'Agata, Ian. "Native Wine Grapes of Italy
photo catalogoviti.politicheagricole.it

Located about 20 miles from Modena this town of low Modena still maintains the octagonal traces of its Renaissance fortress structure. Around Piazza Constituent core and reference the entire city center, ancient buildings, partly original and partly rebuilt, were part of the large complex of the Castle of Pico della Mirandola, famous humanist and scientist of the fifteenth century.

Pico della Mirandola, famous humanist and scientist of the fifteenth century.

Some typical aromas: dark cherries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries.

A glass of Lambrusco Salamino with its typical darker color.